Your go-to for all things real estate marketing.

5 Easy Ways to Build Your Brand and Set Yourself Apart

In a world full of real estate agents — more than 6 million, according to some estimates — standing out from the crowd can feel impossible. The best agents, though, have figured it out: Through careful research and thoughtfully-planned communications, they’ve developed a killer personal brand that elevates them above their competitors. To help you keep up in today’s ever-changing world, we’ve put together this 5-step guide to building your brand that will elevate your business, engage your audience, and transform your public perception.

1. Research your competition

The entire concept of “branding” might seem nebulous, but whether you work in real estate or robotics, every high-quality brand starts with the same thing: research. After all, you can’t build a standout brand if you’re not keyed in to the competitive landscape.

The entire concept of “branding” might seem nebulous, but whether you work in real estate or robotics, every high-quality brand starts with the same thing: research. After all, you can’t build a standout brand if you’re not keyed in to the competitive landscape.

Start with a simple Google Search for something like “real estate agents near me.” In addition to noting the names and websites of any agents who come up, pay close attention to whether or not they have a Google Business Profile. Additionally, take note of whether or not your competitors are using Google Search Ads to stand out from the crowd. Both Google Business Profiles and Google Search Ads are indispensable ways to drive more traffic and brand awareness (and more leads), so it’s helpful to know which agents are maintaining their online presence the right way.

Sure, searching for your competition on Google might seem entry level, but you’ll need to compile information about as many competitors as possible., and Google is a great way to discover more about the competitive landscape where you live. You don’t need to take note of every agent you find in your search, though: Focus your attention on agents who work in similar neighborhoods with similar clients. If there are any local agents you admire (or envy), throw them into your competitive analysis as well.  

Think of this process like a CMA for realtors instead of listings: You need information about as many outside entities as possible before you can best decide how to position yourself. 

We recommend using the SWOT (strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, threats) system to evaluate each of your competitors, taking special care to dive into their web and social media presences. Any “opportunities” or “threats” you come across during your SWOT analysis are especially important, as these can provide insight when you’re positioning your brand in the competitive landscape. 

 It’s not glamorous, but by scoping out the competitive landscape, you can deepen your understanding of the best way to position yourself for maximum visibility. 

Start with a simple Google Search for something like “real estate agents near me.” In addition to noting the names and websites of any agents who come up, pay close attention to whether or not they have a Google Business Profile. Additionally, take note of whether or not your competitors are using Google Search Ads to stand out from the crowd. Both Google Business Profiles and Google Search Ads are indispensable ways to drive more traffic (and more leads), so it’s helpful to know which agents are maintaining their online presence the right way.

Sure, searching for your competition on Google might seem entry level, but you’ll need to compile information about as many competitors as possible, and Google is a great way to discover more about the competitive landscape where you live. You don’t need to take note of every agent you find in your search, though: Focus your attention on agents who work in similar neighborhoods with similar clients. If there are any local agents you admire (or envy), throw them into your competitive analysis as well.  

Think of this process like a CMA for realtors instead of listings: You need information about as many outside entities as possible before you can best decide how to position yourself. 

We recommend using the SWOT (strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, threats) system to evaluate each of your competitors, taking special care to dive into their web and social media presences. Any “opportunities” or “threats” you come across during your SWOT analysis are especially important, as these can provide insight when you’re building your brand and positioning yourself in the competitive landscape.

 It’s not glamorous, but by scoping out the competitive landscape, you can deepen your understanding of the best way to position yourself for maximum visibility. 

2. Decide what you want to say to the world

The most important part of any brand is its unique “value proposition,” a statement that introduces a business’s brand to consumers by telling them what the business stands for and why it deserves the consumer’s business. Once you’ve crafted the perfect value proposition for you and your business, you’ll put it on your personal website in a place that gets a decent amount of attention: After all, you want potential to know what you stand for from the beginning of your relationship. Put it on business cards, social media pages, and anywhere else prospects are looking.

A value proposition can take many different forms. Some agents will feel confident in a sentence-long summation of their brand, but other, more verbose, agents may write an entire paragraph. No matter which approach you take, the key to a great value proposition is focusing on your brand’s unique traits in a distinct, memorable way. 

Let’s take a look at two truly excellent value propositions so you can get a better idea of just what your value proposition might look like. 

Uber: 

A screenshot of Uber's value proposition.
Source: https://www.wordstream.com/blog/ws/2016/04/27/value-proposition-examples

Everyone knows what Uber is, but not everybody knows just how well they’ve honed their value proposition. Uber knows that convenience is its biggest (and most unique) selling point, and the language they use here is direct, informative, and clear. 

iPhone:

A screenshot of iPhone's unique value proposition.
Source: https://www.wordstream.com/blog/ws/2016/04/27/value-proposition-examples

This may be an old iPhone, but Apple’s value proposition has remained clear ever since the release of the very first iPhone. This value proposition takes a different approach than Uber’s: Instead of using simple, direct language, Apple’s statement here is abstract, hinging more on imagery and experience than product features. When taken in concert with Apple’s commitment to holistic design, this value proposition stands out as an example of an effective emotional appeal. 

Spend some time figuring out what makes you and your business unique, then get to writing! Doing a “brain dump” of all your ideas is a great way to start: You can leave everything in a single Google Doc (or a single sheet of paper, depending on your methods), then come back to the most compelling parts of your statements later on. 

Once you’ve settled on a value proposition that feels good to you, send it to friends and family and solicit their honest feedback (emphasis on the “honest” part). Sometimes it takes another pair of eyes to catch the things you’ve missed, and getting an outside opinion will help you retool your statement over time. 

3. Create a persona for your perfect buyer 

First things first: In case you haven’t worked with personas before, a buyer persona is essentially a fictional character that represents the perfect member of your ideal target audience. Everything about this fictional character is up to you to create, but it’s crucial to start with the facts. 

Take a deep dive into a list of your past clients: What are the similarities? What are the differences? How old are they? Are they single? Do they have kids? All of these things may seem like minutiae, but the more true-to-life detail you include in your buyer persona, the easier it will be to use that persona to help you later on.

Many business owners will create multiple personas: Your target audience likely isn’t a homogeneous group, and it’s important to represent your audience truthfully. If you’re lacking data about your previous clients, consider sending out a quick Google Form to collect some information about them, their home, and their lifestyle. 

These personas are pretty fun to create, but they serve a key purpose in the process of building your brand. The real estate industry is centered around an agent’s ability to sell a home to the right person, and if you’ve got a persona to keep in mind when listing and selling a home, you’re more likely to connect the right home with the right buyer while showing off your unique value proposition in the real world.  

4. Find your brand’s voice

As an agent, you spend a lot of time writing. Whether it’s an email exchange with a potential client or a flyer advertising your next open house, words are some of the most important tools available to any agent. 

Once you’ve settled on some of the foundational aspects of your brand, it’s time to figure out your brand voice. Defining the way you speak to people is integral to the success of any great brand, so it’s important to create a voice that thoughtfully represents you, your services, and your company.

Start with a few high-level terms that describe how your brand speaks to people. Are you authoritative? Quirky? Direct? Any and all of these are great places to start.

From there, it’s time to get a little more concrete. Create a brand voice chart like the one below:

A sample brand voice chart.
Source: https://contentmarketinginstitute.com/2015/10/define-brand-voice/

Your chart will look completely different, but establishing “dos” and “don’ts” while building your brand voice is essential to creating a voice that’s both easy to write and easy to understand. 

5. Incorporate your new brand into everything you do

You’re almost there: Your brand is established, your personas are created, and your brand voice has been set in stone. Now it’s time for the hard part: Sending your brand out into the world. Your new brand is a key part of building your business, so it’s important that your new brand is represented at all times.

For example, let’s say you’re in the process of finding a buyer for a new listing. While you’re building out the listing, start thinking about your audience personas in order to figure out who your new listing is best suited for. Once you’ve moved on to writing the text of the listing itself, consult your brand voice guidelines to ensure that the language you use reflects the way your new brand speaks. 

There are countless ways to apply your new brand standards, but regardless of the new brand you’ve created, the most important thing is to make sure you’re staying true to yourself at all times. 

By The Disclosure
Your go-to for all things real estate marketing.

Follow Us on Social

Categories

Archives

Privacy Policy